Filtering by: Webinar

Apr
25
11:00 AM11:00

Webinar: 14 years of Post-fire Recovery in Hawaiian Mesic Forest

Date: Tuesday, April 25th

Time: 11 am to 12pm HST

Register for Free

Join us to learn about post-fire restoration efforts and results at the Waianae Kai - Makaha burn site on Oahu. A 40-minute presentation will be followed by 20 minutes of group discussion and Q&A with the presenters.

Presenters:

  • Tamara Ticktin, Professor of Botany, University of Hawaii
  • Amy Tsuneyoshi, Watershed Resources Specialist, Honolulu Board of Water Supply
  • Clay Trauernicht, Wildfire Mgt. Extension Specialist, University of Hawaii

Background:

Wildfires frequently occur across the leeward, lowland areas of Hawaii. Although most burns occur in grassland and non-native shrubland, fires do spread mauka into dry and mesic forest areas and this pattern will likely increase as climate change leads to warmer and drier weather.

At present there is little information on the recovery of lowland Hawaiian mesic forests after fire or on best practices to restore areas that have burned. In September 2003, a human-caused fire burned 4 hectares of native mesic forest on the ridge between Wainae Kai and Makaha valleys on Oʿahu island.

Through a partnership between the University of Hawaii, the Honolulu Board of Water Supply, DOFAW and Kaʿala Farms, we began a project to document the recovery of the forest from the fire and to restore it. We set up 56 permanent monitoring plots and a series of photo points and in collaboration with community volunteers and Waianae High School students we removed non-native species, established soil erosion control barriers, and grew and outplanted native species seedlings.  Native and nonnative plant species establishment was surveyed in plots with and without outplanting over 2004-2006 and then again in 2017.

Here we present our findings on the recovery of the forest, and the effects of our restoration efforts, 14 years after the burn.  We conclude with thoughts and recommendations for current management of the site and for future responses to fires in mesic forest areas.

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Mar
27
1:45 AM01:45

A Century Of Wildland Fire Research: Contributions To Long-term Approaches For Wildland Fire Management

Date: March 27th, 2017

Time: 1:45am - 6:30am HST (7:45am - 12:30pm Eastern)

Host: Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, National Academy of Science

Free Registration

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Details:

The costs of wildland fire in the United States are enormous, not only in terms of the financial impacts of fire suppression and post-fire rehabilitation of property and ecosystems, but also in terms of loss of lives, impacts on physical health of nearby communities, effects on local and regional economies from losses of revenue, and the impacts of cascading events such as landslides and flooding. Wildland fire management has become even more difficult because of increasingly dry conditions in some areas of the country and the expansion of the urban-wildland interface, among other factors. Within the federal government, for example, more than 50% of the Forest Service's annual budget was dedicated to wildland fire in 2015, up from 16% in 1995. 

This workshop will be recorded and the presentations will be made accessible online for viewing 7-10 days after the meeting.

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Webinar - Fire and Ohia: What this disturbance means for Hawaii's dominant tree
Sep
13
10:00 AM10:00

Webinar - Fire and Ohia: What this disturbance means for Hawaii's dominant tree

Today! Tuesday, September 13th

Time: 10am - 11am

No Registration Required

Free Webinar Access*:

-Guests
-UH Users

* Do not use Google Chrome as your web browser. University of Hawaii users are asked to log in to Halawai. Access available on day of webinar.

 

Join us as Mark Wasser presents on

-Fire regimes in Hawaii, pre contact through present day
-How fire affects Ohia in particular
-Relevant research to date
-How Ohia and Ohia communities will fare under changing environmental conditions and more frequent fires-Relevant research to date
-Management implications

Mark Wasser is a Biologist with Natural Resources Management at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. He holds a Bachelor's degree in Mathematics and an MS (2014) from UH Hilo in Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science. Mark has worked at the National Park for six years, and in conservation in Hawaii for 10 years. 

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Webinar: Finding the Best Science Available on Fire Ecology & Fire Regimes
May
2
3:00 AM03:00

Webinar: Finding the Best Science Available on Fire Ecology & Fire Regimes

Finding the Best Science Available on Fire Ecology and Fire Regimes in Great Basin, California, and Pacific Ecosystems

Time: 9am-10am Hawaii Time (12pm-1pm Pacific Time)

Free Webinar Registration: http://www.cafiresci.org/events-webinars-source/category/feis

Presented by: Robin Innes, rinnes@fs.fed.us and Ilana Abrahamson, ilanalabrahamson@fs.fed.us

Details: Managers and planners need scientifically sound information on historical fire regimes and contemporary changes in fuels and fire regimes to make informed management decisions. To address this need, two new fire regime publications—Fire Regime Reports and Fire Regime Syntheses—are now available and spatially searchable in the recently updated user interface for the Fire Effects Information System (FEIS, www.feis-crs.org/feis/).

Together, these publications help managers develop plans and make informed decisions about local management of fire and fuels. In the updated user interface, they are easy to access using a variety of search criteria, including plant community type and map location, and they are linked to nearly 1,100 FEIS Species Reviews.

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Pre-Fire Planning for Land Managers Webinar
Apr
5
4:00 AM04:00

Pre-Fire Planning for Land Managers Webinar

Land owners and managers play an important role in preventing and reducing damage caused by wildfires. Their actions and in-depth knowledge can support fire suppression efforts and protect high-value assets.

Join Our Webinar Presentation & Discussion covering:

  • Wildfire Risk Assessment
  • Steps to develop your own Pre-Fire Plan
  • Your questions, challenges, and ideas related to pre-fire planning

We'll be hosting the webinar via UH's Halawai platform, which has some quirks!

For a smooth webinar experience, please

  • Do NOT use Google Chrome to access Halawai
  • Join as a guest and do NOT use a "@hawaii.edu" username

Go here to join webinar:
http://www.hawaii.edu/halawai/schedule/guest?action=login&10781322

Halawai Tutorial available at http://www.hawaii.edu/halawai

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Improving Access for Wildland Firefighters
Oct
23
4:30 PM16:30

Improving Access for Wildland Firefighters

Speaker: Jeremy Keller
Presented By: Firewise Communities; National Fire Protection Association

Join wildland fire stakeholders and residents in this informational workshop and discover how modifications can be made to increase driveway accessibility, improve address visibility and hear what fire personnel look for when making decisions about which homes may be defendable; and receive simple tips on how homeowners can help firefighters prior to evacuating. The one-hour format includes a thirty minute presentation from Jeremy Keller, followed by a Q & A session with workshop participants.

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The Effectiveness of Suppression Resources in Large Fire Management
Oct
8
5:00 AM05:00

The Effectiveness of Suppression Resources in Large Fire Management

Speaker: Dave Calkin
Presented By: Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center, Joint Fire Science Program, International Association of Wildland Fire

Wildfire management currently represents over 50 percent of the US Forest Service’s total budget. Suppression of large fires represents the single largest category of fire management and typically exceeds $1 billion annually. In both 2012 and 2013 large fire suppression exceeded the Agency’s budget allocations by over $400 million. Despite the scale of this investment relatively little is understood about how suppression actions influence large wildfire spread and those conditions that ultimately lead to containment. There is considerable uncertainty in managing large wildfires including the quality of weather forecasts, complex environmental conditions, variation in the type and quality of suppression resources, and whether or not requested suppression resources will be assigned.


In this presentation we review several recent studies that attempt to understand how suppression actions influence fire progression as well as review variation among Incident Management Teams in the amount of resources that they use to manage large wildland fires in the US. Despite these recent efforts, there remains limited understanding of suppression effectiveness. These results suggest that modelling large fire containment as a production process of fireline construction similar to traditional initial attack models is inappropriate. Improved understanding of large fire management effectiveness and efficiency will require spatially tracking individual resource assignments, activities, and tactics within the broader suite of fire management objectives and strategies.

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LANDFIRE 101
Sep
4
5:00 AM05:00

LANDFIRE 101

Speaker: Randy Swaty, Ecologist, The Nature Conservancy
Presented By: LANDFIRE, Joint Fire Science Program, Southern Fire Exchange

Randy Swaty, Ecologist with The Nature Conservancy, offers a primer to LANDFIRE, aka “LANDFIRE 101,” that explains the suite of tools that are available those who need science-based data in order to restore/conserve/manage large landscapes in the U.S. Maps and application examples are focused on the Southern Fire Exchange region. He will describe what LANDFIRE is, where to get the products, how you can use them, when and how often the data is updated, and who to contact to learn more -- all in 45 minutes or less. Though examples and maps refer to southeast U.S. locations, information applies to all landscapes across the U.S. There will be time for Q & A.

LANDFIRE and the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) have developed a series of webinars that that are designed to help land managers and others understand and use data resources to assist them when making decisions regarding large landscape projects.

Because the suite of LANDFIRE tools are based in vegetation history and current conditions, they can be applied in both fire and non-fire related activities and are particularly suited for running scenarios and considering management plans.

Each series of three webinars share the same components: an introduction to LANDFIRE (aka LANDFIRE 101), a look at a report or case study of how LANDFIRE products were and are being used on the ground, and a session on customizing data for specific landscapes. Each includes information that is based in the geographic area of the particular consortium. Because the components offer the same resource information, you are welcome to register for any of the sessions in any region.

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Firewise - Mulch Combustibility
Aug
19
10:30 AM10:30

Firewise - Mulch Combustibility

Speaker: Steve Quarles, Ph.D., IBHS Research Center
Presented By: National Fire Protection Association, Firewise, Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety

Join Firewise Communities/USA® residents throughout the country in a special virtual workshop event! The one-hour format includes a thirty minute presentation by a subject matter expert followed by a thirty minute live “Ask an Expert” interactive opportunity for pre-selected homeowners to ask a question related to the session’s topic. This unique learning format provides wildland/urban interface homeowners with information on how to make important mitigation modifications at their homes. Participation is limited to the first 100 registrants.

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Jul
30
5:00 AM05:00

Using Social Marketing and Micro Targeting to Engage and Move Woodland Owners to Stewardship

Sponsored by: Clemson Cooperative Extension
Speakers: Jerry Greenberg (American Forest Foundation); Mary Tyrrell (Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies)

This webinar will discuss the importance of social marketing as a tool for conservation. What is social marketing and why should planners and natural resource manager's care? How can data be used to understand your audience? A case study will describe how social marketing was used to encourage land managers in The Driftless Area (a unique region in the Upper Mississippi River Basin encompassing southeast Minnesota, southwest and west -central Wisconsin, northeast Iowa, and a part of northwest Illinois) to identify and involve unengaged landowners in a priority landscape.

View the webinar

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Jul
17
5:00 AM05:00

The National Climate Assessment and Wildland Fire Implications

Sponsored by: International Association of Wildland Fire, Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center, and Joint Fire Science Program

The new National Climate Assessment (NCA) summarizes present day and future impacts of climate change on the United States. Observations are showing changes in temperature and precipitation patterns causing societal impacts outside of recent experience. Wildland fire examples include among others lengthening fire season, more extreme fire danger, and disturbances such as insect induced tree mortality and invasive species. Projections of future climate indicate a continued increasing trend of weather/climate extremes and impacts. While climate acts as an enabler, future fire will also be an outcome of political and societal resolve.

This presentation will provide an overview of the process and results for the new National Climate Assessment, and relate those findings to wildland fire, management and societal implications.

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Jul
15
8:30 AM08:30

Firewise - Understanding How Embers Ignite Roofs in a Wildland Fire and How to Make Your Roof More Survivable

Presented by: National Fire Protection Association, Firewise Communities, Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety
Speakers: Steve Quarles, IBHS Research Center

Join Firewise Communities/USA® residents throughout the country in a special virtual workshop event! The one-hour format includes a thirty minute presentation by a subject matter expert followed by a thirty minute live “Ask an Expert” interactive opportunity for pre-selected homeowners to ask a question related to the session’s topic. This unique learning format provides wildland/urban interface homeowners with information on how to make important mitigation modifications at their homes.

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Communicating About Climate Change -  From Impacts to Solutions
Jun
23
6:00 AM06:00

Communicating About Climate Change - From Impacts to Solutions

Americans are waking up to the reality of extreme weather events are beginning to connect the dots to climate disruption. Effectively engaging the public as partners in addressing the challenge requires emphasizing local, current and personally relevant impacts and bridging to solutions. Join environmental communications expert Cara Pike and Executive Director of Climate Access, for a discussion of the latest trends in public opinion poling, how to frame the climate conversation, and best practices in climate engagement.

Sponsored by: Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP), Northern Arizona University
Speaker: Cara Pike (Climate Access)

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The Role of Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives
Jun
16
5:00 AM05:00

The Role of Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives

Presented by: Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP), Northern Arizona University
Speakers: Mike Montoya (Mescalero Tribal Fish Hatchery), Neil Patterson, Jr. (Tuscarora Environment Program), Cheryl Shippentower (Department of Natural Resources)

The significance and role of traditional knowledges is being explored among indigenous groups, and within many regional and national climate change initiatives. This webinar will explore the ways in which indigenous traditional knowledges may inform understanding how climate change is impacting indigenous cultural resources and life ways, and help lead to culturally-relevant adaptation strategies.

The webinar will also examine the critical need for indigenous peoples and non-indigenous entities to understand what may be at risk when traditional knowledges are shared in non-indigenous forums, and what is needed to ensure that traditional knowledges are only shared with the Free, Prior and Informed Consent of indigenous governments and knowledge holders. Recognizing and obtaining FPIC can help bolster successful collaboration between indigenous and non-indigenous partners through equitable relationships, reduced disputes through mutual understanding of roles and responsibilities and lead to culturally appropriate adaptation strategies. The webinar will also share the experiences of the Yurok Tribe in utilizing traditional ecological knowledge to inform climate change priorities.

Find more webinars from Northern Arizona University

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Jun
5
8:30 AM08:30

Fuels and Fire Behavior Data Collected on Wildland Fires by the Fire Behavior Assessment Team (FBAT)

  • Presented by: Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center, International Association of Wildland Fire, and the Joint Fire Science Program
  • Speakers: Alicia L. Reiner (U.S. Forest Service); Carol Ewell (U.S. Forest Service, Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team)

Fire behavior and effects models are frequently used to inform fire and land management decisions despite a lack of testing against field measurements. The Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team (AMSET, USFS) coordinates a module focused on the collection of pre- and post-fire fuels and fire behavior data during wildland fires to fill this knowledge gap, called the Fire Behavior Assessment Team (FBAT). FBAT goals are to: 

  1. Explore relationship between pre-fire fuels and fire behavior and effects with field data,
  2. Supply data and video useful for improving firefighter safety and public outreach, 
  3. Build a dataset useful for calibration of consumption, smoke production, and fire behavior and fire effects models, and 
  4. Measure fire effects on archeological, botanical, and biological values.

In coordination with incident management, sites are placed opportunistically ahead of the fire accounting for current and expected fire behavior, safe access, and fire management tactics. Each site consists of both heat resistant fire behavior equipment left on-site through the fire and fuel inventories. ince the inception of the FBAT module, the full data complement has been collected within 14 wildland fires (98 sites) and several experimental prescribed burns (32 sites). This webinar will outline the current methods and data variables collected by FBAT to demonstrate the utility of this data for fire managers and scientists.

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Jun
4
5:00 AM05:00

The Role of Fire in Shortgrass Rangelands

Presented By: Great Plains Fire Science Exchange, Southwest Fire Science Consortium, Southern Rockies Fire Science Network
Speakers: David J. Augustine, Rangeland Resources Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Fort Collins, CO
 
Topics include:

  • Climate and Fire in the Great Plains
  • Traditional & Contemporary Perspectives on Fire
  • When Does Shortgrass Burn?
  • Prescribed Fire Effects on Forage Production, Livestock Production, Unpalatable Plant Species, and Wildlife Habitat"
     
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Predicting Local Smoke Dispersion During Low-Intensity Wildland Fires in Forested Environments
May
7
4:00 AM04:00

Predicting Local Smoke Dispersion During Low-Intensity Wildland Fires in Forested Environments

Sponsored by: JFSP, International Association of Wildland Fire, Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center
Speaker: Warren Heilman

Smoke generated from low-intensity prescribed fires used for fuels management can have an adverse impact on local air quality, raising human health and safety concerns especially in wildland-urban-interface areas. Local smoke behavior is a complex process and is highly dependent on local ambient atmospheric conditions (e.g. wind speed and direction, stability) and fire-induced atmospheric conditions.

The presence of forest overstory vegetation can add further complexity to the local dispersion of smoke. Planning and managing low-intensity prescribed fires in forested environments may be enhanced with meteorological and smoke modeling systems that adequately account for the effects of forest overstory vegetation on fire-fuel-atmosphere interactions and the local transport of fire emissions. 

Through a recently completed Interagency Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) study involving meteorological and air-quality monitoring and modeling of low-intensity prescribed fires in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, we now have additional insight into how forest overstory vegetation can affect local smoke dispersion.

A new version of the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) capable of simulating turbulent flows inside forest vegetation layers (ARPS-CANOPY) was developed as part of the study. When coupled with an appropriate particle dispersion model, ARPS-CANOPY could potentially be used to predict local air-quality impacts of low-intensity prescribed fires in forested environments. This presentation provides a summary of some of the key meteorological/air-quality observational and ARPS-CANOPY-based modeling results as well as follow-up efforts to test the feasibility of using ARPS-CANOPY as an operational tool for predicting local air quality impacts of low-intensity fires"
 

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Sub-Canopy Transport and Dispersion of Smoke
Apr
24
5:00 AM05:00

Sub-Canopy Transport and Dispersion of Smoke

Presented by: Joint Fire Science Program, International Association of Wildland Fire, Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center
Speaker: Tara Strand

Low intensity prescription burning is used to reduce fuels, improve ecosystem health, and to mimic a natural fire pattern that is otherwise suppressed during the more intense wildfire season. There are many constraints that limit the ability to conduct prescribed burn operations, including (but not limited to) visibility reduction in transportation corridors, and compliance with National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 micrometers, PM2.5) and ozone. 


There is a need for tools that predict potential smoke impacts so that prescribed burns can be carried out within the parameters of these constraints. The sub-canopy transport and dispersion of smoke project was designed to collect a comprehensive dataset that would allow for the testing of the existing modeling pathways within the BlueSky Modeling Framework and, if needed, develop additional modeling pathways, for low intensity or smoldering fires. 


The objective of this study was to collect cohesive data sets that represent low intensity fire smoke emissions and dispersion processes. The goal was to find a smoke modeling pathway within the BlueSky Framework that could be used operationally to predict smoke concentrations from low intensity burns. Observation and modeling results will be presented along with interpretation of what the mean for burn managers.

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Apr
2
7:00 AM07:00

Customizing Data - Critique and Modification of LANDFIRE Data for Local Applications

Presented by: LANDFIRE and Northwest Fire Science Consortium
Speaker: Kori Blackenship, Fire Ecologist, The Nature Conservancy

Kori Blankenship, Fire Ecologist with The Nature Conservancy, brings it all together by looking at methodology involved in "Modifying LANDFIRE Data for Local Conditions," so as to adapt LANDFIRE data for specific needs.

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Elements of the National Weather Service Fire Weather Forecast
Mar
5
4:00 PM16:00

Elements of the National Weather Service Fire Weather Forecast

Presented by: Tallgrass Prairie and Oak Savanna Fire Science Consortium, Lake States Fire Science Consortium
Speaker: Casey Sullivan, National Weather Service, Chicago/Romeoville

Casey Sullivan will provide an overview of the National Weather Service fire weather forecast program and discuss elements of the fire weather forecast available to any fire practitioner. The hourly weather graph and definitions of surface winds will be emphasized. If you missed Casey's presentation at the 2014 symposium of the Illinois Prescribed Fire Council, this is a great opportunity to log on and see what you missed. We estimate 10-15 minutes will be available for questions from the audience.

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Predicting Smoke Impacts with Uncertain Emissions  and Meteorology
Mar
4
5:00 AM05:00

Predicting Smoke Impacts with Uncertain Emissions and Meteorology

Presented by: Joint Fire Science Program, International Association of Wildland Fire, Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center
Speaker: Talat Odman

Smoke from wildland fires can have adverse impacts on visibility and also on public health. Models are available for simulating the dispersion, long-range transport, and chemical evolution of fire plumes and predicting their impacts on air quality. However, these models are not perfect tools for decision making purposes. There are uncertainties in their formulations of complex atmospheric phenomena and the input data they utilize are also subject to various levels of uncertainty. More importantly, the level of uncertainty in their predictions is not well understood. 


While it is difficult to quantify the uncertainty in model predictions it is possible to study the sensitivities to various modeling parameters. Emission estimates and meteorological parameters are two major categories of smoke models inputs and the sensitivities of model predictions to them will be evaluated in this presentation. Uncertainties in bottom-up emission calculations will be illustrated for a case study where detailed fuel and emission data were collected. The sensitivities of downwind smoke predictions to the magnitude, injection height and time rate of emissions will be analyzed. The results of modeling with bottom-up emission estimates will be compared to those obtained using satellite-based emission estimates. The sensitivities to wind speed and wind direction will also be analyzed and compared to emission related sensitivities. The goal of these analyses is to better understand the leading factors of uncertainty in smoke modeling and point to where the efforts should be concentrated for uncertainty reduction.
 

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Introduction to Vsmoke
Feb
20
6:00 AM06:00

Introduction to Vsmoke

Presented By: Southern Fire Exchange
Speaker: Dr. Scott Goodrick, USFS Project Leader & Research Meteorologist

Tune in to learn how to use this spatially explicit smoke model to improve your wildland fire smoke management!

Visit the Southern Fire Exchange webinar page for a list of our other upcoming webinars. If you have any questions please contact us at: sfe@ifas.ufl.edu

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Public USDA Climate Hubs
Feb
14
5:00 AM05:00

Public USDA Climate Hubs

Speakers
Butch Blazer, Deputy Under Secretary, Natural Resources and Environment
Randy Johnson, National Hubs Leader
William Hohenstein, Director, Climate Change Program Office

Purpose
This webinar is intended for all stakeholders, cooperators, and others interested in learning more about USDA’s Climate Hubs, and will provide an opportunity to ask questions. Please distribute broadly to those engaged in climate change research, outreach, forecasting, or otherwise who may be interested in learning more about the Climate Hubs.

Background
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced last week the locations of seven Regional Hubs for Risk Adaptation and Mitigation to Climate Change. The Climate Hubs will build on the capacity within USDA to deliver science-based knowledge and practical information to farmers, ranchers and forest landowners to support decision-making related to climate change across the country.

Download the presentation
 

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